Reading for a Lifetime Together


Bridge to Childhood
March 21, 2010, 11:36 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Jess Aaron has always dreamed of earning the recognition of his father.  And with school starting back up, he will have the chance to become the fasted kid in the fifth grade. During the race at recess, the new girl, Leslie Burke shows up and beats all the boys. Although it was expected that Jess would not care for Leslie, the fact that she was the fastest fifth grader only made their friendship flourish. The two would always cross the creek to get to their secret land. They called it “Terabithia.” They used Terabithia to foster a great friendship and feed their creative imaginations. Jess was an aspiring artist who, with Leslie’s help, became even better. One day, the school music teacher, Ms. Edmunds asked Jess if he wanted to spend a day with her touring the Art Museums in Washington. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Jess went to Washington and toured the museums all day, and when he returned home, he was greeted with the news that Leslie had drowned in the creek they crossed to get into Terabithia. Jess was awestruck and didn’t know what to do. For awhile, he spiraled back into his old self-conscious state and accomplished nothing. When he finally realized that all he could do was embrace Leslie’s death, he pulled out of the spiral and picked up his art supplies. He was never self-conscious again.

In my opinion, Bridge to Terabithia is an overdeveloped novel to get across a moderately simple idea. Even if Jess and Leslie’s friendship allowed them to have a glimpse of a good time, the plot is very heavy for young readers and ends in a sad and depressing way. Also, the extent of Jess and Leslie’s imaginary adventures seems a little extreme and unbelievable. What makes it worse is the annoying movie based off of the book. Obviously, I did not like the book.

-Natalie

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